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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

1 edition of Grain legumes as alternative crops found in the catalog.

Grain legumes as alternative crops

Grain legumes as alternative crops

a symposium

  • 180 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by Center for Alternative Crops and Products, University of Minnesota in [St. Paul, Minn.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Legumes -- United States -- Congresses.,
  • Grain -- United States -- Congresses.,
  • Agriculture -- Economic aspects -- United States -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementsponsored by the Center for Alternative Crops and Products, University of Minnesota, July 23-24, 1987.
    ContributionsUniversity of Minnesota. Center for Alternative Crops and Products.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiv, 194 p. :
    Number of Pages194
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14315933M

    Out of the species of legumes which include grain, vegetable and forage legumes, are native and 20 species belonging to sub group Papilionacae are used as food legumes.   Some legumes are considered weeds of cereal crops, while others are major grain crops; these latter species are known as grain legumes, or pulses, Footnote 1 and represent the focus of this review. For some of these species, the trends for word acreage and yield are available, as Cited by:

      Description Grain legumes are characterised by their nutritional value, an ability to grow rapidly and improve soil health by fixing nitrogen. This makes them a key rotation crop in promoting food security amongst smallholders in particular. However, yields are constrained by factors such as pests and diseases as well as vulnerability to poor soils, drought.   An alternative to this sequential rotation of legumes and grains in place is to interplant the legumes with grain.

    You are here: Home / Alternative Crops: Alternative Crops: About Alternative Crops General Alternative Crop Links. Select crops that may be suitable for small scale farming by limited-resource farmers and small landowners. You will be provided with Web links to cultural requirements and marketing strategies for the crops and states you choose. 1. Tropical Grain Legumes in Africa and South Asia: Knowledge and Opportunities. PO Box , Nairobi, Kenya: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics. pp. ISBN: Order Code: BOE File Size: 1MB.


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Grain legumes as alternative crops Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genre/Form: Conference papers and proceedings Congresses: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Grain legumes as alternative crops. [St. Paul, Minn.]: Center for Alternative Crops and Products, University of Minnesota, [?].

"Smartt does an excellent job of pulling together the available knowledge on grain legumes and realistically outlines future research objectives and potentials for these plants.

This book will serve a useful purpose as a reference for all interested in grain legumes and crop domestication." Daniel Harder, Biochemical Systematics and EcologyCited by: Grain Legume Crops Hardcover – October 1, by R. Summerfield (Author), E. Roberts (Editor) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Hardcover, October 1, "Please retry" Cited by: Grain legumes should be considered apart from vegetable legumes for they are distinct in their uses and nutritional contribution. This chapter includes origin, distribution, and production; family and related species; climate and soil adaptability; cultural factors; genetics and breeding of Barbara groundnut, common bean, cowpea and asparagus bean, horse gram, hyacinth bean, moth bean, mung.

Soybean is not included in the book as it is commonly considered an oil crop more than a grain legume and is included in the Oil Crops Volume of the Handbook of Plant Breeding. Legume species belong to the Fabaceae family and are characterized by their fruit, usually called pod. Lists alternative crop and livestock species and related enterprises with links to Extension sources that help evaluate and start non-conventional farming enterprises.

In the section Field Crops, find alternatives for feed and forage; edible and industrial oils; and food grains, pseudocereals, and legumes. The text provides plant breeders with new scientific information, and familiarizes molecular biologists with the peculiarities of breeding of the main grain legume species.

The first part of the text consists of crop-specific chapters devoted to the most produced and consumed worldwide grain legume crops. Buckwheat, crambe and sesame typically are grown under contract while canola, sunflowers and nuts normally are not.

Contracts are sometimes available for safflower, amaranth, millets and alternative legumes. Some marketing contracts require delivery of a certain amount of product. All grain legumes are agricultural crops which are intentionally grown for the harvesting of mature seeds.

They are just, therefore, a small fraction of leguminous agricultural crops and much smaller as member of the entire leguminous plants. Legumes and whole grains have an important place in any healthy diet. But don't think you're limited to just soybeans and whole wheat flour.

So many types of legumes and whole grains are available – and you have so many ways to eat them – you won't get bored incorporating them into your. Grain Legumes Antonio M. De Ron (eds.) This book is devoted to grain legumes and include eight chapters devoted to the breeding of specific grain legume crops and five general chapters dealing with important topics which are common to most of the species in focus.

Nonlegume cover crops are most useful for: Scavenging nutrients—especially N—left over from a previous crop Reducing or preventing erosion Producing large amounts of residue and adding organic matter to the soil Suppressing weeds.

Annual cereal grain crops have been used successfully in many different climates and cropping systems. Among the grain legumes from the Old World, we may single out two species of the genus Lathyrus (L. sativus L. and L.

cicera L.), one species of the genus Trigonella (T. foenum-graecum L.) and three species of the genus Vicia (V. ervilia (L). Willd., V. monanthos (L). Desf. and V. narbonensis L.) on account of their current state of marginalization.

In Spanish, L. sativus is called by the. Purchase Cereal Grains - 2nd Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNThis list of alternatives was first compiled using AFSIC reference request files, the subject files in our office, as well as previously compiled lists, most notably "Innovative Farming Idea List," () compiled by Nancy Grudens Schuck, Farming Alternatives Project, Cornell University and "Ideas for Alternative Agricultural Enterprises.

With its distinguished editorial team and international range of expert authors, this will be a standard reference for the grain legume research community and farmers of these important crops as well as government and other agencies responsible for agricultural : Shoba Sivasankar. Grain legumes mainly consisting of common bean, pea, chickpea, faba bean, cowpea, lentil, pigeonpea, peanut, Asian Vigna species, grass pea and horsegram are under cultivation in a considerable area worldwide.

With their higher protein content and symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria in root nodules enabling them to fix their own nitrogen, reducing the fertilizer use in agriculture has. As grain legumes, the crops are not grown over wide geographical areas and overall are not important in world trade.

National germplasm collections of each crop are available, however, the curators usually have several crops to maintain or curate a specific collection on a part-time basis. This book presents the most comprehensive and up to date review of research on different cool season grain legume crops, nutrients management, biotic and abiotic stresses management, agronomical approaches for drought management, salinity, drought, weed management and water use efficiency, impact on international trade around the world.

The agronomic pre-crop benefits of grain legumes (Fig. 1(a)) encompass two components (Chalk, ): The so-called ‘nitrogen effect’ is caused by N provision from biological fixation and N sparing processes that provide a longer-term supply to other crops (Peoples et al., a).The ‘break crop effect’ includes benefits to soil organic matter and structure (e.g.

Leithold et al., Cited by:. target legume crops and systems in their distinctive regional settings; and share R4D facilities and expertise to increase operational efficiency and effectiveness.

Justification Grain legumes contribute significantly towards all four of the CGIAR System Level Outcomes (SLOs): reducing poverty, improving food security, improving nutrition and.Start studying Grains and Legumes.

Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Search. is a type of grain used in paella and has a very high starch content.

is a medium-grained wheat that is ofter served as an alternative to oatmeal. Fava Bean. is popular in many Mediterranean and Middle Eastern.Grains, pseudograins, and legumes are not nutrient-dense foods, and they can actually prevent you from absorbing the amino acids you need for a healthy immune system.

Even grain varieties that are promoted as wheat-free alternatives are just as devoid of nutrients.